Tag Archives: US Soccer

Bruce Arena’s USMNT Roster as of Today

With the Gold Cup over and as this over-the-top Michael Bay of a summer transfer window winds down to its absurd conclusion, it’s time to take stock of the USMNT depth chart. There were lots of words written about how the Gold Cup was needed to test out the deeper end of the player pool and find the right players to solidify the end of the USMNT’s bench. Some even went so far as to say that this objective was a higher priority than even winning the tournament.

While I’m not sure whether that was true or not, what is true is that the USMNT has only four official matches left between now and next June when FIFA World Cup 2018 kicks off in Moscow. And not only are those four matches vital, being that qualification for Russia is not secured, but they’re vital because there may not be much time left for experimenting.

With that in mind, perhaps it might be prudent (or at least amusing) to try and dive into the mind of one Mr. Bruce Arena and guess exactly which 23 players he likes the most right now.

One of my biggest pet peeves, especially from MLS fans, is that whenever a player is playing well there are natural calls for his inclusion into the Men’s National Team. However they do this without ever considering tactics, formations, or which players would have to be removed from the roster due to their inclusion. You can’t have 34 player on the USMNT. I always remember Jurgen Klinsmann now infamous platitude: “There are others ahead of him.” But it’s true. You can’t take them all. Cuts need to be made. And often times, cuts near the end of the bench are more about fit and need than talent which is why guys like Sacha Kljestan, Christian Roldan, Benny Feilhaber, Lee Nguyen, Kelyn Rowe, Juan Agudelo, CJ Sapong, Dom Dwyer, Sebastian Lletget and other guys MLS fan boys clamor for just don’t have a spot. In fact a lot of these guys aren’t really even close when you kind of map it all out like I did below. But I digress.

So without further ado, let’s predict who Bruce Arena might have penned (or merely penciled) in at the moment and then we’ll get into what my thoughts are.

The following picture is a diagram I designed to help flush out all the names in the player pool and how I think Bruce perceives them:

US Pool
Remember Julian Green?

Using this as my guide: I came up with the following roster:

us roster
Sebastian Lletget was my first man out.

Now let me explain how I got to these conclusions briefly before going player by player. I figure, after Klinsmann’s disaster in not having a backup for Jozy Altidore after his injury in 2014, I think Arena will attempt, for the most part, to take two of every position. For example, I think Dax McCarty will be on the roster simply to break in case of an emergency, i.e. a Michael Bradley injury. I’m not sure he’ll really have any other chance of starting alongside Bradley, save for a late 5-10 minute close-out. In that vein I arranged the roster in anticipation of Arena truly trying to build a roster rather than a collection of the 23 most talented football players in the country. This roster should be based on some variation of a 4-4-2 or possibly 4-2-3-1 (although as I’ll explain later, I wouldn’t be surprised if he whipped out the 5-3-2 again).

lineup

Forwards: I don’t think saying Jozy Altidore is a lock is any kind of stretch. The likelihood is somewhere around 99.4% that he’s starting the first game of the World Cup against whomever that is.

            Bobby Wood too should be fairly secure in his place. He’s played well for the States for a couple years now, whether off the bench or as part of a striker tandem. The only reason I didn’t lock him in is because when you’re playing in the Bundesliga your career can crater quickly with all the talent around you and there’s pressure to perform week in and week out. So long as he can start regularly he should be in.

As for what happens after those two is tricky. I think most of us still want Clint Dempsey to be involved even if it is as a super-sub. But for a 34 year old, with a heart condition on his medical history, 10 or 11 months is a long time and a lot can happen. I think Bruce should assemble his roster under the assumption that between now and next June Dempsey will dip in form or health simply out of due diligence.

If I had to guess, I’d imagine that Jordan Morris would be the last man in. Up until he scored the Gold Cup Final winner I had him as the first man out. Why? Because someone had to be. The way I see it, the biggest battles to be in or out of the squad are for those last forward/winger hybrid spots and they’re between Arriola, Morris, Zardes, and Lletget. I only see two at most of that four getting in. Maybe a third could get in if Dempsey is somehow out of the picture by next summer. I think guys like Rowe, Joe Corona, Dwyer, Agudelo, Chris Wondolowski, and Sapong are mostly out of the picture and they will be scrambling for a reserve spot with the last two in the first group. Remember you can only take 23.

But Morris’ versatility will help him, especially since we’re really thin when it comes to players who can play “out wide.” As of now, this roster really only has Fabian Johnson and Paul Arriola to supply width. While Nagbe and Bedoya may lineup in “winger” positions we all know that’s not who they are. By design much of the width will come from the fullback positions via DeAndre Yedlin.

The Dom Dwyer situation is harder to read. Being sent home early wasn’t good, but I could see him as the kind of guy Bruce calls for CONCACAF qualifiers and then leaves home for the big show. While his MLS production is excellent and while he probably is the 3rd best true striker in the US pool I still think he’s already done in terms of making the tournament roster. After that, it’s all really just a stab at a bunch of different albeit flawed candidates like Agudelo, Wondolowski, Aron Johannsson, Christian Ramirez, or whoever else.

The last question to ask is: Could Arena take a fifth forward? It’s definitely possible give our program’s predisposition for playing two strikers at a time. A hybrid forward/winger like Zardes could be useful in order to provide deep cover at two positions but I think he’s more in competition with the winger group.

Wingers: The reason I have Pulisic listed as a winger even though he will almost certainly play as a typical #10 is because in reality, for his Club Borussia Dortmund he’s a winger. The #10 role will require him to play further forward than he does at even his club because he’ll be expected to contribute goals not just assists. I wouldn’t be surprised if he actually wound up being more of a second striker in the end. Or maybe he will play as part of a three man midfield and Wood can start with Jozy. The possibilities are endless with him. Or maybe his talents may even permit the USMNT to play with Jozy Altidore a sole striker in order to get an extra midfielder in the center of the park which hopefully would prevent the USA from being once again overrun in the possession battle as we have been in the past with teams like Mexico, Ghana, Germany, Belgium, etc.

christian-pulisic-dortmund_1owiehz8v8uvzb2zvre10ez3
As an 18 year-old, Christian Pulisic is already the lynch pin to the USMNT offense.

As I alluded to earlier, this is by far the USMNT’s weakest position. It’s so weak in fact, that I wouldn’t be surprised if at some point Bruce Arena whipped out a 4-4-2 diamond or a 5-3-2 just to find a formation which best catered to the strengths of our best players.

In fact, two of the four wingers I predicted Arena will select and utilize aren’t really wingers at all: Darlington Nagbe and Alejandro Bedoya. Bedoya doesn’t even play as a winger for his club; he plays as a number 8, which is far more suited to his skill set and his tendency to hustle at both ends of the pitch. However, while Nagbe does play as a left midfielder for the Portland Timbers, you could easily find some very smart Timbers fans and MLS fans who don’t believe this is his best deployment. When Portland won the MLS Cup two seasons ago, they did so with Nagbe in the central of the park. But, Arena seems to agree with Caleb Porter that Nagbe is best suited as an inverted winger.

This point brings me to the only other full blown lock of the group: Fabian Johnson. Johnson is an excellent footballer playing at a consistent level in the German Bundesliga mostly as a wide left midfielder. While he is versatile and capable of playing a myriad of positions, I still have a sneaking suspicion he could wind up as a left back.

Why? Partly it is because I’m still not sold on Jorge Villafaña. It’s not the he’s a bad player, he’s a fine player and a good quality CONCACAF level player. But while he’s been a steady starter for Bruce Arena, I’m not convinced that his club career and his form will be steady over the next eleven months. He’s only made 35 appearances in all competitions over the past year and a half for Santos Laguna.

And partly it’s because I think Darlington Nagbe has made a nice little case for being one of the starting “wide” midfielders. Although I guess one solution to that issue could be to move Fabian Johnson to the RM or RW position in order to keep Nagbe wide. It’s not as if that RM position is anything closed to being locked down.

And lastly, I have DC United’s Paul Arriola as the final man in beating out the likes of Sebastian Lletget, Gyasi Zardes, Kelyn Rowe and Joe Corona (who really isn’t a winger anyway). It seems like Paul Arriola as much as anyone has improved his stock this summer between his game in Mexico City and the Gold Cup. He brings a youthful dynamic to the group and if needed can provide some width if it’s ever called for late in a game. In essence he’s Alejandro Bedoya’s back up who can pretty much do all or close to all of what he can do.

Who else could slide in? I guess Zardes with his LA Galaxy connections is always hovering around the selection and Jordan Morris is a nice fit because he can play two positions, but after that I’m not really sure. Could Bruce take 5 wingers? I doubt it as it isn’t a focal point of our tactics nor do we really have the depth at the position to justify it. Not to mention the fact that Pulisic is actually our best player at the position.

Midfielders: As has been the case for nearly 7 or 8 years now, Michael Bradley is the first name picked for the USMNT midfield whether positioned as a holding midfielder, a box-to-box guy, or even for a short time as a #10. These days he’s been regularly placed as as a #6 and the team has been essentially constructed around that deployment.

Because of this need to put Bradley into his favorite position, the USA often lines up in lesser known formations such as 4-4-2 diamond, 4-1-4-1, or the 4-1-3-2. While I’m not a fan of these they are oddly suited to the US personnel. The other common formation is the flat 4-4-2 which never seems to do Bradley any favors and in my recollection usually guarantees that the USA’s possession percentage will hover around 40%.

After Bradley it gets hazy quickly. As I said before I think Dax McCarty makes the roster simply as the poor man’s Michael Bradley. He’s the closest approximation to Michael Bradley when the Captain plays as a 6. In fact, at the MLS level, I really don’t see that much of a difference between McCarty and Bradley’s ability. Unfortunately for Dax his steady play has not yet translated to the international level. I think it could if he was able to play alongside Bradley in order to become this cycle’s Kyle Beckerman: a defensive minded player who gives Bradley more ability to help the team with all the good offensive things he does. But it doesn’t seem to be in the cards in Bruce Arena’s eyes. C’est la vie.

I think Kellyn Acosta is pretty close to being locked in. He’s a phenomenal MLS player and his upside will carry him farther than perhaps his performances alone would. I know the MLS crowd loves him and rightfully so, but I’m not sure I want him out there against France or even a Croatia in a World Cup group stage match. But I think as of today that may be Arena’s move.

The last man out for me was Sebastian Lletget-if he can get healthy and in form enough to get called into some matches-would be Sebastian Lletget. (I don’t know if it’s possible but maybe he could aim for a call up to the October World Cup Qualifiers against Panama and Trinidad & Tobago.) Again he may not be known as a top USMNT talent, but he has a couple things going for him. 1) Versatility. That’s always a good thing to have from a coach’s perspective. 2) Connection to Bruce Arena. Never hurts to have an “in.” 3) He was last seen scoring a goal in the 5’ minute of his USMNT debut. And like Buddy Holly or Ritchie Valens (Admit it millenials, you have no idea who either of these guys are!) you’re always more fondly remembered if you go out when you were at your peak. If he gives Bruce Arena any reason to take him he will. In fact, I had him in and Jordan Morris out all they way through the Gold Cup Final. But Arena’s trust to start Morris in the semi-final and final changed my mind.

There's no way a regular EPL player isn't a USMNT starter, right?
There’s no way a regular EPL player isn’t a USMNT starter, right?

The big wild-card here of course is Germerican Danny Williams. After several years in the Championship with Reading, Williams has made the big move to Huddersfield Town AFC in the Premier League. I don’t have him on this roster because I do buy a little into the conspiracy theory of Bruce Arena as an MLS-approved candidate. I think that for a player based abroad to get selected he’ll have to be so much better than MLS rival that it will be impossible to ignore. Otherwise, I don’t think Arena will pick them. Now, I can’t claim to have seen a ton of Danny Williams at Reading. But I do know that if he gets 25 or 30+ starts in the English Premier League it would be unprecedented not to take him. Did you ever think the USMNT would be in a place where it would be turning down the chance to call up an EPL regular? I certainly never did.

Actually, the bigger wild card here is Jermaine Jones. The dude will just not die. He turns 36 in November and has been injured almost the entirety of the season. But even Bruce Arena couldn’t quit him. I was stunned back in March when Bruce Arena called Jones into the squad for qualifiers against Honduras and Panama even though Arena knew Jones would be suspended for the first game due to yellow card accumulation. And then he started him in a flat 4-4-2 midfield alongside Michael Bradley in the second game despite the fact USMNT fans have been screaming for years that alignment doesn’t normally pan out in our favor (which it didn’t in that game). He may not be healthy now, but I’m not going to count this guy out until he’s six feet under.

Fullbacks: As of now, I think the only lock at either fullback position is DeAndre Yedlin. He’s got pace, he’s got World Cup experience and he’s coming off a good season for Newcastle United in the Championship. But while I hear every USMNT fan and pundit writing him in as the starting RB with permanent marker, there are a couple things to worry about. The first is that Newcastle is in the Premier League now and they’re a big club. If he can’t do a job or has even one bad game, he won’t get the next start. Also worrying is the fact that Newcastle signed 23 year-old Javier Manquillo from Atletico Madrid (on loan with rivals Sunderland last season) in the transfer window. Even starting out as Newcastle’s opening day RB will be a tough battle.

For now Jorge Villafaña seems a likely choice. But why did I place Jorge Villafaña on Bruce Arena’s roster even if I think he could be up for a rough year at club level? Because Bruce trusts him and will want a true left back on the roster. But that doesn’t mean that he has to play him when the time comes to face off against a World Class international team. I would think that Johnson and Nagbe is a much stronger left side than Villafaña and Johnson. I have a hunch at some point Bruce will have this come-to-Jesus moment. Or maybe he’ll simply use Johnson as a LWB after adopting some kind of three centerback formation.

After those two the player pool gets murky. Graham Zusi got the key starts at the Gold Cup over Championship veteran Eric Lichaj. But Graham Zusi will be a 31 year old winger with only a season and a half of RB under his belt by next summer. I was amazed that he was more trusted than lifelong and steady professional right back Lichaj. But if his job is just to be there in case something happens to Yedlin, he may make the roster. His versatility and late dead ball ability may be something Bruce Arena really likes as a tool on his bench.

This last fullback spot was the roster slot I spent the longest time trying to figure out. So hard in fact that I think Arena may just figure Fabian Johnson and Jorge Villafaña are all the cover he needs at leftback and he can take someone else like Lletget or Zardes instead. But assuming he takes two true leftbacks, I chose Greg Garza for a few reasons. Firstly he’s similar in style to Villafaña. Secondly, it wasn’t long ago before his injury when Garza during his days at Club Tijuana was the LB from Liga MX du jour. He’s an MLS All-Star level fullback and he might already be the best LB in MLS, American or foreign. Also, he’s 2 years younger than Villafaña. But if Villafaña has already secured a roster position and Arena wants a like-for-like backup for him then Garza is his man.

The last man out for me was DeMarcus Beasley. Talk about people who never die. Beasley will be 36 years-old next summer and despite “retiring” from the National Team already, I can’t imagine he would turn down the chance to go to a freakin’ fifth World Cup (He’d be only the 4th person to do it; or tied for fourth if the corpse of Rafa Marquez also makes it, though that seems likely now with his legal issues). Beasley was last seen playing for the USMNT as a LWB at the Azteca. Could he rise again? I will never doubt him.

And as I’ll discuss later, I think the second left back spot could be sacrificed. It could be sacrificed because Fabian Johnson will be the backup left back or because for a fifth centerback. That fifth centerback would likely Tim Ream who can also provide the “break in case of emergency” cover at LB as well.

Could Tim Ream benefit from a need to take 5 CBs?
Could Tim Ream benefit from a need to take 5 CBs?

Another major player for a fullback position is Timothy Chandler. Again, like Danny Williams, it’s funny to think that the USMNT is in an era where it could seriously consider not taking a player who is a week-in, week-out starter for a German Bundesliga club. But, his bad play in a USMNT shirt, his seeming disinterest in making some of the call-ups, and the fact that Yedlin is almost certainly the starter make his selection far more doubtful than I could’ve imagined.

Centerbacks: The centerback position was fairly straightforward. Ideally Bruce Arena wants to take four centerbacks. Preferably two right-footed and two left footed. Luckily the top four centerbacks seem to fit that mold. If we presume John (don’t call me Anthony) Brooks and Geoff Cameron are the starters, then Omar Gonzalez (a long-time Bruce Arena disciple) and the left-footed Matt Besler make the most sense because they have such experience and familiarity with the program. Despite the talent of the “Matts” Hedges and Miazga it was Besler and Gonzalez that Bruce trusted in the end.

The only other player I could see fighting his way in is Tim Ream. Beside the fact that he’s Besler’s only real rival as a left-footed CB, I think the Fulham man would be a smart addition (if perhaps necessary) addition to the roster if Bruce Arena does go with a three centerback formation. When a team goes with three centerbacks it makes taking five centerbacks mandatory. He may benefit the most from that after he played so well as a LCB in the away match against Mexico.

I know the “Matts” will make a push and I agree that they’re very promising I just don’t see how they leapfrog Besler and/or Gonzalez. Simply put: “There are others ahead of them.”

Goalkeepers: OK, I lied. Goalkeeper was the most straight forward position to select. I have a gut feeling; actually it’s more of a hunch that Tim Howard and Brad Guzan will be the #1 and #2 goalies.

After that I had kind of a three way scramble for the final spot between Ethan Horvath, Bill Hamid, and Jesse Gonzalez.

Horvath is 22 years old and all the Brian Sciaretta types seem to think highly of him. If Arena thinks he’s the next great goalkeeper, maybe he takes him. Gonzalez however is 15 days younger than Horvath and in my opinion is already a top three MLS ’keeper. After all the fuss USSoccer made to convert Jesse from El Tri to the USMNT maybe he should be the one.

But I think it will be Bill Hamid. He’s 26 and, believe it or not, he’s been a pro since 2009. You’re going to want someone Hamid’s age (26) to bridge the generation gap between Guzan and Horvath/Gonzalez. Plus I think when push comes to shove if you actually had to put someone in a game I think you’d prefer Bill to Ethan or Jesse.

Reserves: And as for Bruce Arena naming those seven reservists/injury replacements? If I had to predict Bruce’s 7 I think we might be looking at something like:

Tim Ream (Fulham): You always want that extra left-footed CB.

Eric Lichaj (Nottingham Forest): He’s veteran professional capable of playing LB and RB

Danny Williams (Hudderrsfield Town): It will be tough to ignore an EPL player even if he’s only a part time starter.

Sebastian Lletget (LA Galaxy): He’s a Bruce Arena favorite and in his 12’ USMNT minutes he already has a goal.

Kelyn Rowe (New England Revolution): He’s kind of like a slightly more athletic and versatile Brad Davis. But not as Good.

Gyasi Zardes (LA Galaxy): His game kind of reminds me of an American soccer version of Danny Welbeck. He looks like he should be good, but isn’t good enough in front of net to play striker. But coachable and dedicated enough to get starts out wide.

Chris Wondolowski (San Jose Earthquakes): C’mon, look into your heart; you know it to be true.

But that is a total stab in the dark.

WHAT WOULD I DO?

And with all that said, we now come to what I would do, if I were picking the USMNT roster. Here’s how I’d have it and why.

As I’ve continually reiterated throughout this overly lengthy analysis, there does exist a more than just a token chance that Bruce Arena does something funky. Look, if after only three days to practice he can implement and play a three centerback formation at the Azteca with mostly backups then he can do it in preparation of the World Cup. Yes he may be unwilling to implement it again down the final four game stretch of the Hexagonal, but once the October games are over, provided the USA qualifies, Bruce Arena will have nearly four months to plan and scheme.

Once he starts all his little plans and schemes he’s going to realize a few things. One that Omar Gonzalez is a better centerback than Bedoya is a RM or Kellyn Acosta is a CM. I also think he’s going to realize the best wide players on the pitch are Johnson and Yedlin. I also think both those players make for better wingbacks than fullbacks as both lack the defensive discipline for that at the international level. I’m also convinced that at some point Danny Williams is going to become impossible to ignore. I also think he’s going to realize that he wants Johnson and Nagbe on the pitch together to maximize our talent (ability to maintain possession). And I personally, I am really in favor of this. I really think this could be our eventual formation and lineup.

Could we wind up in a 5-3-2?
Could we wind up in a 5-3-2?

For those of you counting at home the league breakdown of the starting 11, it is: 4 MLS, 3 German Bundesliga, 3 EPL, 1 Liga MX.

For my fantasy roster as a whole it is: 13 MLS, 5 German Bundesliga,  3 EPL, 1 Championship, 1 Liga MX.

(Turns out my roster is far more MLS-centric than I figured it would be. But then again the USMNT is far more MLS-centric than it probably should be.)

So once you’ve admitted to yourself that three centerbacks are the way to go, and once you figure out your starting XI, then you can begin to mold the back end of the roster. So ideally you want a backup at every position. My bench would be almost a like-for-like replacement of every position save for Omar Gonzalez. You don’t need to bring six centerbacks, even if playing three at the back. That gave me the chance to bring an extra forward/midfielder who would ideally be Clint Dempsey… but you never know.

Yes, missing out on nice promising players like Arriola, Acosta, Morris, Hedges, or Miazga may seem cruel, but are those guys really going to be the difference between us winning a game we might not otherwise have won? No, I don’t think so. One other criticism I would anticipate is that the lack of youth on the team doesn’t keep the team “hungry” and “energized.” People will point out Arena’s failure at FIFA World Cup 2006 was largely due to the fact that he picked an old squad that aged overnight and was complacent.

While Sacha Kljestan and Benny Feilhaber aren’t spring chicken’s anymore, I don’t think you’d have to worry about complacency with either of them. Both would be totally energized at the prospect of playing in a World Cup-Kljestan for the first time.

Also some of the “older” players like Dax McCarty, Clint Dempsey, Graham Zusi would have their own reasons for being motivated. Dax because it’s his first trip, Zusi because he’s at a new position, and Dempsey because he’s Deuce and is as fiery as they come, especially now that he’s been doubted.

Guys like Danny Williams, Tim Ream, Darlington Nagbe would also all be first timers and motivated. And several young guys like Pulisic, Yedlin, Brooks, Wood, and Jesse Gonzalez would play integral roles pushing guys to maintain their energy levels.

As for the reserves I think these seven would be good:

Matt Hedges-Best young American CB in MLS.

Jorge Villafaña/Garza-Either would work for me as true LB.

Eric Lichaj-I like his experience.

Kellyn Acosta-He’s still a talent.

Paul Arriola-Love the energy, but he wouldn’t have a position in the 5-3-2.

Jordan Morris-If a striker goes down he’d be the next in line.

Dom Dwyer-Can never have to many out-and-out goal scorers.

Also aside from Acosta, who could serve a role on this roster, Morris nor Arriola are going to have a fit because of the lack of width. I guess Morris could play as a striker, but he’s not as good as solo striker as Jozy or Wood.

In the end, I do expect this three centerback formation to pop up again in an important spot for the USMNT. But no, I don’t expect my roster to be Bruce’s even if he does go back to 3 CBs. In fact his 3 CB formation might implement wingers as he used more of a 3-4-3 at the Azteca in March.

Anyway I hope we’ve had a good look at the depth of the player pool and what exactly the USMNT roster looks like at this particular moment in time. Again it’s easy to say someone deserves a look. It’s much harder to pick the 23 and start cutting people when you realize you have to make choices. Maybe we’ll update this after the two September qualifiers as we see Bruce integrate the European contingent for the big home match against Costa Rica in Harrison. Those two lineups will tell us a lot about what he learned during the Gold Cup.

I’ll be back in a few days to break this down from the Mexico National Team perspective. Vaya con Dios mis amigos.

A Rather Lackluster Tournament, Jurgen

After the first of these five most recent games by the U.S. men’s national team, most of the headlines about the dominant 5-1 victory over Scotland centered around the hideousness of Nike’s new uniforms. From there however, there were far more interesting and important story lines that developed over the final four matches.

So, without further ado, here are my soccer related thoughts from the weekend.

Let’s start with the basics: First let’s look at Jurgen Klinsmann’s preferred starting XI:

Obviously, there were several adjustments to the lineup due to Clint Dempsey‘s injury as well as all injuries at left back, but I think throughout these five games, the one thing we seemed to have learned is who are Jurgen Klinsmann’s preferred players.

This seems to be his ideal formation and selection:

Jose Francisco Torres—–Clint Dempsey—–Landon Donovan

Michael Bradley

Maurice Edu———————Jermaine Jones

Fabian Johnson-Carlos Bocanegra-Clarence Goodson-Steve Cherundolo

Tim Howard

Nothing makes me more nauseous than U.S. fans who defend Oguchi Onyewu.

The first thing I’m sure that US Soccer fans noticed right away before the Scotland game was Klinsmann’s implementation of a 4-3-3. Obviously I have no way of knowing for certain, but I have more than a sneaking suspicion that this formation elated most US fans. It’s amazing that Jurgen Klinsmann is actually doing what he said he was going to do back when he took the head job. He’s encouraging the USA to play a more attack minded brand of football. But he’s not just doing it for aesthetic reasons or because he wants to seem revolutionary. Instead, he’s doing it because it best fits the US personnel.

But after that game, we seemed to immediately go back to a 4-2-3-1, which I didn’t really understand. For Brazil it was the smart decision. It’s impossible to try and win an up-tempo offensive minded slug-fest against them. But then, the players on the pitch tried to do exactly that. It resulted in a 4-1 thrashing.

The one thing the game may have done, and for which I am incredibly grateful, is that it might have permanently ended Oguchi Unyewu‘s tenure with the national team. Klinsmann has tried to be quite conciliatory to the older U.S. veterans, but Unyewu looked downright terrible. I have never been a fan of the big stiff centerback. It just seems every time I see him play that he gives up a penalty kick. Goodbye, I say. And good riddance.

Herculez Gomez definitely did the most to help himself over the course of these five matches.

Clarence Goodson on the other hand seems to have done himself quite a bit of good during these friendlies and qualifiers. Goodson seemed to earned a permanent starting spot for Bob Bradley during last year’s Gold Cup, but had to re-prove himself for Klinsmann. But after Geoff Cameron‘s own goal and Unyewu’s disaster effort, he really didn’t have to do much. Now, I’m not the biggest fan of Goodson. I think his strength is a real problem and that he would be exposed in a World Cup against big and strong European strikers, but he is an ideal player for CONCACAF style soccer.

The one player though who seemed to make the biggest impression on Jurgen over the five games may have been Mexican based Herculez Gomez. He was the lone bright spot for the USA during the Brazil game and Klinsmann preferred him up top even when Dempsey was placed more forward. He and Jose Francisco Torres definitely did the most to improve their standing with the national team over these past couple weeks. Both of these guys are players I really like and should bring us a different dynamic that we don’t often possess, that creative ball control and attacking style.

Overall, I’m still a little perplexed by the limited selections by Klinsmann. If we were to take this preferred starting XI to a World Cup today we’d be out of the tournament by the end of the second group stage game. It’s time to phase out a couple guys and that may include Cherundolo and Bocanegra.

Jermaine Jones is another player I’m not crazy about but he’s definitely someone who brings the “nastiness” Jurgen Klinsmann desires.

The German-American connection: Two of the more interesting performances that required keeping an eye on were those of Fabian Johnson and Terrence Boyd. The development of this German-American sect of players by Jurgen Klinsmann has been an interesting one. Even with Timothy Chandler out of the mix, Jermaine Jones remains a near regular and Danny Williams, Boyd, and Johnson continually earn curious looks by Klinsmann.

Johnson seems to have the left back position all but sewn up. Despite the admirable performance by Edgar Castillo during his spot start, there seems to be no one Klinsmann likes here other than Johnson.  During the Scotland game he gave Terrence Boyd a look. Probably more out of curiosity than anything else. The young German-American has yet to earn a first team appearance with his club, yet Klinsmann gave him a start due to Dempsey’s injury. It was definitely clear that Jurgen knew how poor a side Scotland really was and thought he’d give Boyd a chance to shine. But he is certainly not ready. It took him far too long to get the ball off his foot. He seemed more than a little overwhelmed. Luckily Herculez Gomez stepped up well into the role of second striker.

MLS midfielder Marco Pappa proved to the U.S. that there are few matches they can take for granted in CONCACAF.

I think it would best be described as over-matched. It looks like Clint Dempsey isn’t going to make it back in time to play Brazil, which is devastating to the US fans that are itching to see Dempsey and Donovan on the field together. I’ve listened and read to a good bit of commentary about tweaks Klinsmann could’ve made to do better against Brazil. But the honest truth is that this team was completely overmatched, even against a Brazil B-team.

The qualifiers. There’s no doubt that anytime you get to watch the U.S. Team for five games over a short span it’s fun because it’s such a rarity. But going win, loss, draw, win, draw isn’t exactly tearing it up. Especially considering they only really played one quality opponent. The draw against Canada was inexcusably lifeless.

But it was the draw at Guatemala which was most frustrating. Now granted, I didn’t see it because I didn’t have $29.95 to spend and I was too busy watching Mexico take on El Salvador in San Salvador. While Mexico took care of business with a great late goal by Hector Moreno in abysmal conditions, the United States was giving up a free kick by Chicago Fire midfielder Marco Pappa, missing out on two points.

How’d our rivals do? Speaking of our Mexican rivals, I think it’s also worth mentioning that Mexico played very, very well over their five game set. Unlike the U.S., they won all five of their games including a sound 2-0 win over Brazil in Dallas.

      Javier Hernandez

Andres Guardado—–Giovani Dos Santos—–Pablo Barrero

                                 Jesus Zavala—————Carlos Salcido

Jose Torres-Nilo-Hector Moreno-Francisco Rodriguez-Severa Meza

Joe Corona

There can be no doubt, Mexico is a class above the United States right now.

This seems to be the lineup of choice for Chepo De La Torre going forward. Certainly the front four looks the same. With Carlos Vela seemingly out of the national team picture and Aldo De Nigris best suited as a super-sub, these four young players seem destined to be the same come Brazil in 2014. Even Giovanni Dos Santos, who cannot find a good club situation seems as good as ever whenever he puts on his Mexico jersey. De La Torre also seems much more comfortable with Corona over Guillermo Ochoa, who I thought had a fabulous game against Bosnia. But regardless, this young Mexico team seems to know exactly where it’s going.

Their one big area of weakness: defensive midfield seemed to be in flux as veterans Gerrado Terrado, Israel Castro, and Rafael Marquez all seemed to be ready to be phased out of international duty. But De La Torre seamlessly moved left back Carlos Salcido up to midfield alongside Mexican league star Jesus Zavala. In particular, the 24 year old Zavala seems to be another great young core player for Mexico to build around.

Conclusion. And that really in and of itself is the big difference between these two national teams. Last week, after the Canada friendly, I heard a commentator on the MLS Extratime Radio Podcast actually say that Canada, like Mexico was chasing the United States for title of top team in CONCACAF. Now, perhaps I misheard, but I’m pretty sure he claimed the U.S. was the best team in the region.

He couldn’t be more wrong.

There’s still a long way for this team to go. Hopefully Jurgen Klinsmann knows the best route for getting there.

While Mexico is continually phasing out 30-something regulars in favor of players in their early 20’s, the U.S. is still trying to figure out if Oguchi Onyewu has anything left in the tank. MLS has given such a wide breadth of young players to choose from that it has become frustrating. I understand that we’re nearing the end of a generation of Americans that gave us great soccer memories, but that doesn’t mean they get to stick around the team longer than they should. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, if a 35 year old Carlos Bocanegra at center back and a 35 year old Steve Cherundolo at right back are our best options for those positions in 2014, then we’re not going to go anywhere significant.

There are so many Americans to choose from these days for National Team selection and there often isn’t much separating one player from two or three others at their position other than personal preference. This is always going to make player selection a contested issue for the United States. I just think going with the same old players is going to get us the same old results.